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Saturday, July 22, 2017

Hair Styles for Four Season

The Four Seasons:

Seasonal changes in weather patterns, eating habits and metabolic factors often affect hair. I have already discussed nutrition and metabolism in other chapters, and the advice given doesn’t necessarily need to be changed. It may, however, be obvious that summer diets are different to those of winter; our metabolism is also different. But the purpose of this chapter is to point out how weather factors can be overcome, along with social requirements of the seasons.
I will start with summer for no other reason than that perhaps it is the most enjoyable season.

Hair Styles for Four Season: Summer, Autumn, Winter, Spring

SUMMER


Summer can be a perilous time for your hair. Those wonderful rays of sun that can tan your skin can blister it too. The same applies to your hair: the sun can lighten and streak it to a healthy-looking, sporty shade, but it can also frizz, frazzle and burn it if you’re not careful. When combined with wind, heat, salt or chlorine, the results can be disastrous.

Many of you will think that because the sun’s rays are natural, the change of colour in your hair that the sun gives is not damaging–but it is just as damaging as applying bleach. And, as with bleach, the effects are not just confined to color changes. The sun weakens the hair’s protein structure, de-moisturizes it and reduces elasticity so the hair breaks more easily.
Why your hair is not thought of when you apply sun protection to your skin is a mystery to me. Your hair is going to the same places, so why leave it out? ‘Oh! My hair’s dead anyway,’ you may think (see Chapter 2, ‘Is Your Hair Dead or Alive?’).
The top layer of your skin is replaced in twenty-eight days. In this time your hair will grow only half an inch; if your hair is an average length of 9 inches, the ends will be one and a half years old and will have lived through at least one summer. The ends, therefore, will be bearing old scars, so to speak, so it is important not to make them worse. A hat is the best protection, but you may think them boring or unattractive or inconvenient.
There are simple ways to protect your hair from the sun without incurring too much expense. If you want to maintain your hairstyle, mix some high SPF oil-free suntan lotion with your regular hair-spray, half and half. Shampoo and condition normally and, whilst the hair is still wet, spray on the mixture, comb through for even distribution and style as usual. When dry, spray on some more. You will be nicely coiffed and your hair will be protected.
There is, of course, some effective sun protection hair sprays available, as well as some excellent sun protective leave-in conditioning styling aids.
For the pool or beach you will need extra protection. Chlorine and salt water can ravage your hair, so you should use a water-resistant application. There are many available, but your own mixture can be reasonably effective by shaking together some waterproof high-protection factor suntan oil with a thick conditioner. When thoroughly mixed, apply it along the hairs’ length in sections, placing more on the ends; comb through for even distribution. The combination of oil and conditioner will protect your hair from chlorine or saltwater, maintain the hair’s moisture levels and condition it, all at the same time. Re-apply after swimming. Since this preparation is greasy, it will give your hair a slicked-down look, which by the pool or beach is rather attractive. Don’t forget that your scalp is vulnerable to sunburn, so make sure your parting is protected.
If the weather has been really unkind to your hair, a pre-shampoo deep conditioner should be used. But one should be used at least once a week throughout the summer anyway (see photograph showing split ends,. There are many of these available to buy, but if you feel like it, you can make one yourself by whisking together:
2 eggs
2 half eggshells of olive or other light vegetable oil
1/2 ripe avocado
2oz (50ml) of purified water
Work the mixture in with your fingertips, leave for ten minutes and then wash off.
Guard against split ends by not over-brushing. Sun, heat, salt, chlorine and wind are enough to cope with; you don’t want to have twice the number of ends as well. Hair tends not to do things in half measures, and if you are not careful, your ends could finish up like a shaving brush. Go gently and preferably use a blunt saw-cut comb.
Be careful not to pull the hair back too hard, and spread a little conditioner around the elasticized fabric to avoid it cutting into the hair. And, of course, daily shampooing and conditioning of your hair goes without saying–but that’s easy in the summer.

AUTUMN

Even though you have tried to protect your hair during the summer, somehow the weather has really got to it. Now autumn is here, you realize that the sun, wind, pool, sea and beach that all felt so wonderful at the time have not been so wonderful for your hair. It has become dry, dull and split. This is all the more frustrating, as the more formal requirements of autumn mean sleeker, smoother and more cared-for looking hair.
The first step is to trim off the split ends–you’ll be surprised at what a difference this can make. Secondly, re moisturize, as precious moisture will have been lost during the summer, affecting your hair’s resilience, elasticity and shine.
You may think that rubbing in some hot oil will help. It won’t, as you can finish up with lank, oily or maybe drier hair if it needs lots of shampoo to remove it. You wouldn’t slather oil onto dry skin, you’d apply a moisturizer instead.
Your hair cortex, which forms the main bulk of your hair, is protected by the cuticle, a flat layer of overlapping cells. However, after a hectic summer the cells are no longer as flat or overlapping, and as a consequence the moisture in this vulnerable cortex could be considerably diminished. Misshapen, raised cells do not reflect light as well as flat ones, and dullness inevitably creeps in. There is little doubt that products such as deep conditioners for use prior to shampooing made specifically for this type of hair damage are better than home-made ones. They should be left on the hair for about fifteen minutes before shampooing out to give them time to pump moisture into the hair cells. You can sleep with them on occasionally, or if you’re doing nothing social during the day, put some on in the morning and wash it off in the evening.
If you do want to try some home recipes, an acceptable autumn re moisturizer can be made with all manner of kitchen staples as long as it combines water, oil and emulsifiers. For example, mix:
2oz (60g) of soft margarine
1oz (30g) of butter
3oz (90g) of single cream
3oz (90g) of heavy conditioner
Whisk in a blender and apply the mixture to the hair in sections, working in well with the fingers. Leave on for fifteen minutes under a warm, damp towel or even overnight under a shower cap and towel. Rinse thoroughly and follow with your regular shampooing programmed. A few of these treatments at frequent intervals will make quite a difference to the condition of your hair. When you are happier about your autumn look, an occasional application, say every two to three weeks, will maintain it. Look for moisturizing style's and protectors, too.

WINTER

Don’t let winter send your hair into hibernation. You can keep it alive and vibrant more easily than you think. The changes in temperature, humidity and the environment that occur in winter take their toll on you and your hair. Every time you step from a dry and heated home, office, store, cinema or theatre into the cold air and out of doors, your body and hair struggle to keep pace. Your hair alternates from dry and electric to floppy and limp. You may put on and take off a hat many times during the day, which ruins your hairstyle or look, as hats crush your hair and cause your scalp to sweat. It’s not that I’m against the wearing of hats, but if your hair becomes damp under one and you then proceed to take it off when you go into a warm atmosphere, your hair will dry unevenly and probably have an attack of the ‘frizzies’. Furthermore, heavy winter clothes can also make you and your scalp sweat, particularly on those cold, drizzly winter days. If your hair has already dried into an odd shape and then gets damp again, you are liable to end up looking bedraggled. By the end of the day your hair’s a mess and you’re very unhappy with it and yourself.
If that isn’t bad enough, winter is the worst time for flaky and itchy scalps. Stress levels are higher during winter, and stress encourages the production of flakes and oiliness. Dissatisfaction with your hair increases this stress, and by midwinter you really have the blues. But this can be avoided, even though winter is the most difficult season of all for hair. The most important point is to continue daily shampooing and conditioning, something that is often neglected for fear of catching cold. However, there is no more danger of catching cold with damp hair than dry hair; it is simply that our resistance is lower in winter–wet hair has nothing to do with it. Less frequent washing also encourages a flaky scalp and lank hair.
Perk up your scalp with a tonic. To make one yourself (if you don’t want to buy one) shake together equal quantities of witch hazel and mouthwash–2oz (60g) of each will be sufficient. Add 1/2oz (15ml) of vodka and shake again. Apply the liquid to your scalp by parting the hair and sprinkling it on or by using a ball of cotton wool. Massage your scalp for five minutes and follow up with your usual shampooing programmed. Your scalp will feel refreshed and your hair will benefit, despite the winter weather.
Diet is also important, but somehow the salads and fruit of summer don’t seem so appealing when it’s cold and dreary, and therefore people tend to eat more stodgily in winter and drink much less water. By all means eat hot stews, but make sure they contain lots of vegetables. If you can’t face cold salads, eat hot cabbage (dark green and red), blanched broccoli, cauliflower, spinach and any other colored vegetables you like. Also eat plenty of fruit–tangerines and clementines are wonderful winter fruits.
Even though it may be cold, try to get some exercise. Go for an invigorating walk for some fresh air, leaving your hair to the elements. When you get home, give your hair and scalp a treat by applying the scalp tonic, putting some conditioner on your hair, lying in the bath for a while, then luxuriously washing your hair with your favorite products. It will cheer you and your hair up so much that in no time at all you’ll remember that, ‘The hounds of spring are on winter’s traces!’

SPRING

You can’t quite put your finger on it, but somehow or other your hair seems to have lost its vitality. Whatever you have been doing to your hair during the winter, the chances are that everything spring stands for, in terms of renewal, regrowth and revival, has given you the resolve to look at your hair anew. You will want to resurrect it in some way by changing its style or color; you may even want to perm it or cut it off.
What better time is there than spring to give your hair a vital boost? Firstly, get your style right. Styling and vitality are not necessarily complementary, but if a certain style and color pleases you, then your morale is likewise boosted. Remember that if your hair is dull, coloring does not give it shine, it only gives it color. Your hair will seem to lack body, too–one reason being that you may have grown it longer during the winter months. If there is ever a time to restyle and trim your hair, spring is probably the best.

The signs of regaining lost vitality in your hair are adding shine and body. I have already discussed this in Chapter 19 on ‘Frustrations and Difficulties’. However, there are other things–starting with your scalp. The chances are that there will be some flakiness, so apply some of the home-made tonic described in the winter section previously, but in this case just mix together equal quantities of mouthwash and witch hazel and apply after shampooing and leave it on.
When taken internally, zinc can help cell reproduction. Used externally it can also be beneficial. Buy some zinc oxide cream (making sure it is a cream oil in water emulsion and not ointment, as this is not water soluble) from your pharmacy, mix it with an equal quantity of mouthwash and two large sprigs of crushed fresh mint until it is quite runny. Apply the mixture to your scalp in 1-inch (2 1/2 cm) partings and massage it gently for five minutes. Wrap your head in cling film and warm, wet towels for fifteen minutes, changing the towel as it cools. Wash out with your favourite shampoo and conditioner, and style as usual.
If your hair is particularly dry and lackluster, apply a heavy moisturizing conditioner (after massaging with emulsion and not ointment, as this is not water soluble) from your pharmacy, mix it with an equal quantity of mouthwash and two large sprigs of crushed fresh mint until it is quite runny. Apply the mixture to your scalp in 1-inch (2 1/2 cm) partings and massage it gently for five minutes. Wrap your head in cling film and warm, wet towels for fifteen minutes, changing the towel as it cools. Wash out with your favorite shampoo and conditioner, and style as usual.
If your hair is particularly dry and lackluster, apply a heavy moisturizing conditioner (after massaging with zinc oxide cream (making sure it is a cream oil in water emulsion and not ointment, as this is not water soluble) from your pharmacy, mix it with an equal quantity of mouthwash and two large sprigs of crushed fresh mint until it is quite runny. Apply the mixture to your scalp in 1-inch (2 1/2 cm) partings and massage it gently for five minutes. Wrap your head in cling film and warm, wet towels for fifteen minutes, changing the towel as it cools. Wash out with your favorite shampoo and conditioner, and style as usual.
If your hair is particularly dry and lackluster, apply a heavy moisturizing conditioner (after massaging with the zinc cream). Spread this all over your hair and then wrap it up for fifteen minutes. Rinse with plenty of warm water before applying your shampoo. Wash thoroughly, use your regular conditioner and style as usual. It may sound time-consuming–it is–but these two applications used twice a week for a few weeks will give your hair an incredible boost, new life and springiness (no pun intended). Spring does give us all an extra springiness–why not make sure it also applies to your hair.


1 comment:

  1. There comes a blog to solve my daily issues regarding hair. Well my hair are a total mess. These are some really helpful tips. Thanks alot!

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